Start-Up Attacks Media Bias

Posted in Blogs & Blogging , on September 9, 2008

This article covers an interesting new tool that helps users discover media bias.

Users download Spinoculars, a toolbar that sits atop the browser and lets readers know if the story they are reading has any phrases or words that indicate bias. (It works only in Firefox now and will work in Internet Explorer in a couple weeks.) It highlights those phrases in a big red box, and readers can click to find out what exactly SpinSpotter found wrong with the phrase.

The concept is novel, and considering our times, probably something many consumers would love to have. But, I have to say I don’t really see how its going to work. They will have to prove its effective and accurate first.

Desperately wanting to find spin, I went to the Silicon Valley gossip site, Valleywag, which makes no qualms about writing stories with its own snarky spin. Yet calling PR people “the most annoying people in our inbox” did not raise any red flags on SpinSpotter. Writing that Rupert Murdoch is “not going to have any luck recruiting an outsider to fill the spot” of MySpace China chief executive wasn’t spin either.

That is partly because SpinSpotter has started out with very few phrases in its database of spin, said Mr. Herman.

You can learn more about SpinSpotter by visiting their website.


RelevantNoise: Keeping track of the political buzz

Posted in Blogs & Blogging, Online Strategy, Politics , on September 3, 2008

I’m a big politics buff, so I thought this article was rather interesting as it brings together my interest in interactive media and the world of politics (and its related to a tool I have used and can recommend).

Bloggers and social media enthusiasts on the Internet have weighed in on the recent McCain – Palin ticket, and the responses have pulled the Republican nominee into a virtual tie with Senator Barack Obama in the blogosphere.

I’ve had the opportunity to test-drive the technology behind this — lots of powerful intelligence and analytic tools to help you interpret the “noise” out there.

…according to RelevantNoise(TM), Zeta Interactive’s technology that mines the Internet’s social media landscape — including over 100 million blogs, as well as countless message boards and online communities — the buzz on the Internet regarding John McCain has skyrocketed by more than 12 percent since the announcement of Palin as his running mate, bringing him virtually even with Obama for the first time in the campaign.

I’m rooting for McCain, and was happy with his pick for VP, so its nice to read the good news. From a political strategy point of view, it seems to me that all the attacks on Sarah Palin is backfiring for the Obama campaign and has them off-message.

Since announcing Palin as his running mate, McCain also has benefitted from an increase in positive posts on the online media landscape. According to RelevantNoise, the number of posts that were determined positive in tone increased from 47 percent in the month prior to announcing his VP to 59 percent positive on the day that McCain named Palin. (Click the URL to see the volume and tonal charts) – http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20080903/NYW144


Relevant Noise: Listening to the conversations

Posted in Blogs & Blogging, Web 2.0 , on February 2, 2008

I’ve been looking into Zeta Interactive’s RelevantNoise and hope to get a closer look through a demo and maybe a trial run. Having worked in the blog world for several years, I know how powerful it can be to be able to track what bloggers are saying.

Here is how they describe it:

Are your ears ringing? They should be, because someone out there in the social internet – 75 Million blogs, countless message boards and online communities – is probably talking about you. And what they’re saying could make or break your brand or your products.

Think it can’t affect you? You’re wrong. What you don’t know CAN hurt your brand. But knowing – and staying one step ahead of the tide – can empower you to protect your company, clients, products or services.

With Zeta Interactive’s RelevantNoise overview dashboard, you can quickly see what these “citizen journalists” are saying about your brands across social media – and the impact they’re having – in real-time.

I’ll write more once I get a better look at the tool.


A little more about online journalism

Posted in Blogs & Blogging , on November 3, 2007

After a quick search, I found a very interesting power point I think would be very helpful to aspiring journalists. Check it out.


Day Two: Conference for Minority Journalists of Faith

Posted in Blogs & Blogging, Events , on November 3, 2007

We started this morning with a session with photojournalists Gary Fong & Kenneth Irby. Interestingly, Kenneth is a ordained pastor, which made for a very fun Gospel-like presentation!

Kenneth Irby

I’ll be presenting along side La Shawn Barber at 1PM about the power of blogging. I have read La Shawn’s blog for a long time, but I never had the honor of meeting her. I’m hoping to learn a thing or two from her, as well as from the many other great presenters today.

La Shawn Barber

You can get a preview of what I will be talking about via SlideShare.net.


Day One: Conference for Minority Journalists of Faith

Posted in Blogs & Blogging, Events , on November 2, 2007

Dr. Robert Case is providing introductions for the start of the conference. I just heard the sad news that my good friend Rudy Carrasco won’t be here tonight. Day One: Conference for Minority Journalists of Faith

Herbert Lowe will be giving the introduction keynote speech.

Herbert Lowe is director of communications for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, a nonprofit research and policy organization based in Washington, D.C. Prior to joining the foundation in May 2007, Lowe was a newspaper reporter at Newsday in New York City. He is a past president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), the world’s oldest and largest organization for journalists of color.

Lowe was elected on Aug. 8, 2003, to a two-year term as NABJ president, and served as chairman of its 19-member board of directors and chief spokesman during a period of unprecedented growth. The total of full, associate and student members swelled to a record 4,695 in July 2004, a 43 percent increase from a year earlier.


In NY for WJI Conference for Minority Journalists of Faith

Posted in Blogs & Blogging, Events , on November 2, 2007

Hi everyone, Sorry I have been missing in action for so long. There has been a lot going on, starting with a recent job change and a move. I hope to keep blogging here, though it won’t be with the same regularity that you have seen in the past.

I’m in NY City this evening, and I got to bring along my lovely bride. I’ll be speaking tomorrow along side LaShawn Barber about blogging at the WJI Conference for Minority Journalists of Faith. I’ll post up some thoughts later tomorrow, but for the most part, I’m going to spend my time sharing with students and having a nice time with my wife.

Professional and college journalists of faith will gather together for the annual World Journalism Institute weekend conference for minority journalists of faith. The conference will take place at The King’s College in midtown Manhattan.

This unique conference is designed to provide the Christian minority journalist with a brief introduction to the courses and networking of the World Journalism Institute.

Those who attend will be encouraged and challenged to integrate their Christian faith and journalism practice in a fashion appropriate for today’s mainstream newsrooms. The conference is an opportunity to meet other like-minded journalists from around the country to discuss issues facing the minority journalist of faith.

The conference will be composed of lectures, seminars, media tours and fellowship. The third annual Samuel R. Cornish Lecture will be given in honor of Cornish, who founded the first African-American newspaper.


Connecting your organization with new media

Posted in Blogs & Blogging, Online Strategy, Resources , on October 13, 2007

Rob Neppell just launched a new company:

Kithbridge, Inc. was launched as an evolution of one of the blogosphere’s original and most successful blog-tracking sites, The Truth Laid Bear. While The Truth Laid Bear provides a portal and blog search engine for individual bloggers and blog-readers, Kithbridge provides customized technology, services, and strategies for businesses, political campaigns, nonprofits, and other organizations which seek to fully engage with the growing and dynamic world of the blogosphere and new media.

Kithbridge’s founder and president is Rob Neppell, known online by the pseudonym “N.Z. Bear”. In 2002, Rob created the first and still-definitive blog tracking system, The TTLB Blogosphere Ecosystem, and over the past five years has earned a reputation as one of the key innovators in the new world of weblogs and citizens’ media.

If your company is wanting to make inroads in the world of new media, Rob is your man. You can read more here.


Heads Up: Conference for Minority Journalists of Faith

Posted in Blogs & Blogging, Events , on October 2, 2007

I’ll be part of a panel discussing blogs, and online writting at this year’s WJI Conference for Minority Journalists of Faith. You can see the full list of educators who will be presenting.

Professional and college journalists of faith will gather together for the annual World Journalism Institute weekend conference for minority journalists of faith. The conference will take place at The King’s College in midtown Manhattan.

This unique conference is designed to provide the Christian minority journalist with a brief introduction to the courses and networking of the World Journalism Institute.

Those who attend will be encouraged and challenged to integrate their Christian faith and journalism practice in a fashion appropriate for today’s mainstream newsrooms. The conference is an opportunity to meet other like-minded journalists from around the country to discuss issues facing the minority journalist of faith.

The conference will be composed of lectures, seminars, media tours and fellowship. The third annual Samuel R. Cornish Lecture will be given in honor of Cornish, who founded the first African-American newspaper.

ENROLLMENT CAP
Enrollment for the weekend conference is limited only by classroom size. Carpe diem!

COST
Because of generous underwriting, a registration fee of $50 is the cost. World Journalism Institute will provide meals and some classroom materials.


Viral Marketing at Work

Posted in Blogs & Blogging, Viral Marketing , on July 21, 2007

I saw the trailer for some mysterious movie or some sort of project — the trailer didn’t say what it was about. I got a sense it was for a Godzilla movie, but thats just my idea. Then I found this blog post.

The rumors began when a trailer appeared in front of the movie “Transformers” two weeks ago. The trailer is low-fi at best and depicts a house party in New York City that appears to be a going-away party for some guy we’ve never seen before (go here to see the trailer.). The party gets disturbed by an explosion and we then witness crowds of people running and some reference to a lion. The trailer is cool, and being something of a fan-boy myself, I am anxious to know what the project actually is, but the marketer in me is the one that’s really interested, because the fallout and the response is what I find to be of most interest (at least while I’m at work).

Sounds like their efforts are paying off! My interest was certainly VERY peaked. And I am blogging about it…

Abrams followed up with Harry Knowles of Ain’t It Cool News with this posting (http://www.aintitcool.com/node/33261) to leak some of what the public had already found. It appears that there are sites posted and hidden throughout the Web that are starting to build buzz without revealing what is going on. The sites are cryptic, such as http://www.1-18-08.com/ and they make no sense. Is this a movie? Is it a new TV show? Is this the “project” mentioned on his site with HBO? Rumors fly about a Voltron film and a new Godzilla film, and all of it is based on nothing more than what someone else might have said about it. Amazing!